Staff Book Club: The Hardest Questions Aren’t on the Test


I was thinking it would be nice to start some discussions for faculty via a summer reading opportunity. As we move forward, it is important to have collegial discussions about pertinent topics related to our ongoing school improvement efforts for all students.

Here is our next book…The Hardest Questions Aren’t on the Test by Linda Nathan.

Prompts to consider (see the chapter titles in the book, such as):

  • How are discussions of race and achievement taken on by a healthy professional learning community?
  • What makes great teachers possible, and how much can school leaders really ask of them?

Please add your replies to our blog.

Thanks.

Ed.

Book Description (via Amazon): The Boston Arts Academy comprises an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse student body, yet 94 percent of its graduates are accepted to college. This remarkable success rate, writes Principal Linda Nathan, is in large part due to asking the right questions and being open to seeking solutions collaboratively with faculty, parents, and the students themselves. Nathan doesn’t claim to have all the answers, but seeks to share her insights on schools that matter, teachers who inspire, and students who achieve.

Staff Book Club: Whatever It Takes


I was thinking it would be nice to start some discussions for faculty via a summer reading opportunity. As we move forward, it is important to have collegial discussions about pertinent topics related to our ongoing school improvement efforts for all students.

Here is our next book…Whatever It Takes by Paul Tough.

Prompts to consider:

  • How much knowledge and cultural literacy must a person have to serve diverse communities?  Do our schools teach students and staff to not only appreciate diversity but work in diverse locales? (from the discussion questions of the YNPN Book Club)
  • What can be done within the San Marcos community to bring some of the ideas and practices described in the book to SMHS?

Please add your replies to our blog.

Thanks.

Ed.

Book Description (via Amazon): What would it take? That was the question that Geoffrey Canada found himself asking. What would it take to change the lives of poor children—not one by one, through heroic interventions and occasional miracles, but in big numbers, and in a way that could be replicated nationwide? The question led him to create the Harlem Children’s Zone, a ninety-seven-block laboratory in central Harlem where he is testing new and sometimes controversial ideas about poverty in America. His conclusion: if you want poor kids to be able to compete with their middle-class peers, you need to change everything in their lives—their schools, their neighborhoods, even the child-rearing practices of their parents.

Whatever It Takes is a tour de force of reporting, an inspired portrait not only of Geoffrey Canada but of the parents and children in Harlem who are struggling to better their lives, often against great odds. Carefully researched and deeply affecting, this is a dispatch from inside the most daring and potentially transformative social experiment of our time.

Staff Book Club: Closing the Achievement Gap


I was thinking it would be nice to start some discussions for faculty via a summer reading opportunity. As we move forward, it is important to have collegial discussions about pertinent topics related to our ongoing school improvement efforts for all students.

Here is our first book…Closing the Achievement Gap: Reaching and Teaching High Poverty Learner: 101 Top Strategies to Help High Poverty Learners Succeed by Tiffany Anderson.

Prompts to consider:

  • What strategies might be useful to try with our SMHS students and why do you think so?
  • What support would SMHS staff need to incorporate any of the suggested strategies?

Please add your replies to our blog.

Thanks.

Ed.

Book Description (via Amazon): Tiffany Anderson provides practical strategies that will empower any educator in addressing the black white achievement gap in schools. Anderson recognizes the racial and economic disparities in education and highlights current statistical trends that illustrate the effects of the achievement gap. Anderson emphasizes powerful practical strategies and tips in educating high poverty learners that educators can implement immediately in the classroom. Anderson’s book on closing the achievement gap is a must read for educators who face the daily challenge of reaching and teaching high poverty students who are often left behind

Mr. Uchio’s Biology Lesson


I recently observed a student centered, hands on learning lesson in Mr. Uchio’s Biology class.  The students were dissecting pigs in groups at their lab tables.  They had to identify the various organs and take them out and identify them.  This was a very lively class.  The students were able to take the organs out of the pig and identify each organ with much discussion among the various members at each lab table.  The groups methodically worked through taking out each organ, placing the organ on a paper towel and writing the name of the organ on the towel next to the organ.  I observed one group that was looking on line at a college website about dissecting pigs.  These students were able to use this information to more easily identify the organs correctly.

Click the links below to check out how engaged these students are in this biology investigation. Way to go!

Ed Behrens, SMHS Principal

Pig Dissection 1 (video)

Pig Dissection 2 (video)