Brian Roth: County Distinguished Educator of the Year


San Marcos High School is proud of its own!

Congratulations to Brian “Chuckie” Roth for being named Santa Barbara County Distinguished Educator of the Year. This is much deserved. Mr. Roth has had an impact on hundreds of San Marcos students and has been an inspiration to the staff.

Please take a moment to see the many stories written about Mr. Roth winning this award.

Christy Lozano’s Success Story


I am in the middle of a success story that I don’t mind sharing.  It’s been successful so far.  

Tommy Grant (pseudonym) started in my PE class at the beginning of Term 3.  Tommy is a smart, talented kid and I see that he has a lot of potential to be successful.  If you saw him in the talent show, you know some of what I’m talking about.  Some of what I see with a kid like Tommy is that he is very smart, but he uses his smarts to work the system here at San Marcos and get out of doing stuff rather than using it to be successful in his learning environment.  I am learning that if I can encourage Tommy in his abilities and help steer him onto the right path with it, it is helping him in the areas he struggles with such as simply following rules and being responsible for himself.  I think those are two of the biggest challenges facing Tommy.  And if Tommy learns that he DOES have the ability to follow rules and be responsible it is a win/win situation because it builds Tommy’s confidence in himself and it provides the opportunity for him to learn and for teachers to be able to teach and not have to constantly deal with behavior issues with him.  As a teacher I have to have very clear expectations and boundaries with Tommy, and when he makes mistakes I have to be consistent with consequences.  I also have to have the support of his parents, counselor, and administration.  Lisa Hoffman, Dan Garske, and Tommy’s parents have been supportive, and Tommy is in the process of making changes in a positive direction.  It is a slow process at times and sometimes painful because Tommy’s tendency is to do what he wants, and then he has to face some consequences. At other times, it is very rewarding for both Tommy and for myself because I get to encourage him and praise him for his efforts; and Tommy feels very good about himself.  I have seen much forward progression with him over the past 15 weeks.  I think the other adults involved would agree, and it would be awesome to know if his other teachers have noticed a difference too.  Tommy knows I care about him; and when I do have to give him a consequence, he usually understands that he made a mistake and doesn’t argue with me too much, and we still have a good relationship.

At the beginning of Term 3, Tommy was struggling in his attendance, his behavior, and his personal responsibility.  He had issues with coming to class, dressing for PE, following and participating in the lesson, and following simple rules.  He was argumentative at times and distracting at other times.  Sometimes he lacked motivation.  We had issue after issue at first and he would get upset with me.  Tommy wanted out of my class.  He didn’t want to work inside my class structure. He asked if he could be moved out.  Dan, Lisa, and I talked about what was going on, and we all agreed that he needed to stay in the class and learn to go along with the program.  I talked a lot with Tommy about communicating with me if he was having a hard day, and through a lot of communication and some meetings with Dan and Lisa we established some goals.  Changing behaviors is a slow process for most of us; it is no different for a student.  Over the last 15 weeks, I have seen a great deal of change in Tommy.  He comes to class more consistently; he is almost always the first one done running.  He participates more consistently.  He isn’t argumentative with me even when he makes mistakes and receives consequences.  I get to see a very polite and engaging side of Tommy.  He feels very good about himself and very strong. He has lost over 12lbs.  He is improving in his athletic ability and motivation levels.  Last week he was very tired and didn’t feel like he could run the mile very well, but through some encouragement and his own intrinsic motivation he beat his previous mile time of 7:40 with a time of about 7:15.  Then told me on Monday he ran a 7:04 mile over the weekend.  I have told Tommy many times how proud I am of him and what a great job he is doing.  I have heard him say out of his own mouth “nobody has ever told me great job before!”  Tommy still makes mistakes, bad choices at times, and cuts class occasionally.  He’s not arrived yet to a place of full success, but he’s on the road to getting there.  He is not just on that road because of one person.  It is because many of us have pulled together as a team to support and encourage Tommy on his journey.  It is also because Tommy sees a real positive and beneficial opportunity and realizes that he is capable of working inside the class structure (instead of it being difficult, he enjoys some of it), and he is able to make the choice to get help and encouragement along the way.  He is learning that rules and consequences are a guide to helping him make better choices and to help keep him on a good path.  I am very proud of Tommy; he’s a very capable kid who just needs some guidance and support.  As he is receiving that from many of the adults in his life, he is making positive changes in many areas.

Thanks for the opportunity to share.

-Christy Lozano, SMHS PE Teacher

SMHS Teacher Success Stories


As you may recall, some time ago I sent out an all-staff email requesting success stories from any of you that would be willing to share. I had said that there is so much talent right here on campus that we could all profit from hearing from colleagues about what has been working for us. It could be a simple strategy or activity that produced nice results (such as Dovas Z’s “Weekend Stories”), or something more involved.

In the past couple of weeks, I have received two great examples of teachers finding a way to help a struggling student. One is from Christy Lozano and the other is from Rebecca Frank. In each case, collaboration and persistence seem to be the key. I will start off by posting Christy’s response, as it was the first I received. I will follow with Rebecca’s in another post before too long. I give my thanks to both colleagues for stepping up.

I would love to hear from anyone else who has an account of an experience that might add to the conversation, whether it is your experience or something you have heard about a colleague. Thanks in advance for taking the time to read this and the success stories to follow.

-Phil Levien, SMHS English Teacher

The potential of 1-to-1 iPads in instruction


Earlier this week, Dovas Zaunius (SMHS English teacher) shared a link he found on the webenglishteacher.com blog about 1-to-1 iPad initiatives. The post describes how the teachers of a middle school are beginning to incorporate iPads into instruction, where each student has an iPad for use during the class period.

There are great descriptions of free and paid iPad apps and how teachers used the apps throughout their lessons.

The post helped me to visualize how students and teachers can use iPads to engage further into content and how the workflow of sharing what the students create with the teacher.

Thanks for sharing the link, Dovas.

Do you have ideas of how to encourage more teachers to utilize iPads in their instruction? Please share in the comments.